Contraceptive Pills Contributed To Fall in Ovarian Cancer Deaths Worldwide

The widespread use of contraceptive pills for women had contributed to the reduction of ovarian cancer deaths worldwide. The reduction of hormone replacement therapy had also helped reduce the symptoms of menopause according to studies.

According to Italian scientists who published their study in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology, the use of contraceptive piils for five years or so protects women when they grow older as it removes the risk presented by hormone therapy during a woman’s middle age of 50.

Deaths from ovarian cancer dropped by 10% in the 28 countries of the EU between 2002 and 2012, according to the study. There are substantial variations in the size of the drop between countries. In the UK, the fall was 22%; in Denmark and Sweden it was 24%; but in Hungary, just 0.6%.

Death rates fell in the United States by 16% and in Canada by 8%. In Australia and New Zealand it went down by 12%.

The protective impact of taking the pill is experienced decades later. More than 40% of the over 4,000 deaths year in the UK are in women aged over 75. Women began taking the pill in the 1960s in the UK.